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Do Promoted Tweets work in B2B Social Media?

At Walker Sands, we do a lot of business-to-business social media and we’re always experimenting with the latest tactics within the space. While B2B brands generally lag behind their B2C friends in the social media world, they're quickly catching up and we're learning there is always something new we can do to drive traffic and leads for our B2B clients.

We know we can effectively use Facebook advertising as a means to drive Likes, and, eventually, web traffic. Twitter’s "Promoted Tweets" seemed like an interesting experiment to run, though we were skeptical of the value. So with the client’s permission, we took $100 and promoted five tweets to see what would happen.

 

www.full-stop.net
www.full-stop.net

 

The results weren’t too promising. Our goal was to push traffic back to three locations: A whitepaper, the blog and a conference. This is what we sent out and the results:

Whitepaper

5 Trends to Track in eCommerce #Fraud ow.ly/l4r5s - 3 clicks

Blog

Firewalls & other intrusion prevention systems are unable to stop DDoS attacks (more on the @ThreatMetrix blogow.ly/l1QBq - 9 clicks

"Denial of Service Attacks Grow a Whopping 20% Over Last Year." More on the @ThreatMetrix blog: ow.ly/kQ1Iv - 5 clicks, 1 RT

Avoid a very expensive cup of coffee! Follow these tips to stop #cybertheft when using public Wi-Fi ow.ly/kNkmM - 7 clicks

Conference:

Thinking of attending the @ThreatMetrix Cybercrime Prevention Summit? This view might convince you: ow.ly/i/24dzu#TMSummit2013 – 3 clicks, 1 RT 

One month and $100 later, we received a total of 14,559 impressions. Of those who saw the tweet, 137 interacted with the tweet in some way (by clicking on the URL, the hashtag, the Twitter handle or the “expand” button). We didn’t see a sizable jump in overall Twitter traffic (our organic efforts appeared to be better) and we didn’t see a noticeable jump in followers.

Now, the jury is still out on whether or not this is a useful channel. The budget was small and the tweets can be further optimized based on this experiment, but it’s not promising. It’s possible the goal should be to drive more followers or to simply drive “awareness.” There are many possibilities of why this could have been better. But based on this and other experiments, Promoted Tweets in a B2B setting drive click through rates that are little better than banner ads.

How about you? What kind of results have you seen with Promoted Tweets?